Music: “Tashi” – Original Score

I’m very excited to bring you the original score I composed and produced for Vivek Singh Sangwan’s short film “Tashi.”

If you can listen to only one track, make it “A Letter to Buddha (End Titles).”

“Tashi” tells the story of a Tibetan boy who seeks out Buddha to ask him a difficult question.

Of all the film/video game scores I’ve done over the last few months (which I will share in due course), this is the project I’m most proud of because Vivek and I worked together very honestly, and with openness to each others’ different approaches. We ran through many different versions of the music until we found the kind of tone he was looking for. The music had to have a presence without stepping over the naturalism of the film. We also decided early on that we would give Tashi a primary theme, which you will find recurring throughout the score, evolving. You can even hear a very rudimentary version of it in “First Demo.”

I’ll share the film here as soon as it’s publicly available.

Please share the score if you think it’s worth it!

Okaasama Otousama – A Picture Book

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Okaasama Otousama.

So this is exciting news! I illustrated a children’s book as part of my internship with Tulika Publishers, and it’s now for sale! My first published book.

The book, written by author Sandhya Rao, is “a joyful tribute to multilingualism that says Mother and Father in 18 different languages – from Japanese to Kikuyu, Spanish to Finnish, Tulu to Tagalog.”

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Amma Appa (Tamil).
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A spread from the book. Nana Baba (Kikuyu) and Baba Aai (Marathi).
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Detail.

A lot of research went into accurately depicting all kinds of details, from patterns and motifs on clothing to environments and facial features.

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Thanthey Thaayi (Kannada).
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The print.
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A spread from the book.
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Mami Papi (Spanish) and Matri Patri (Sicilian).

My goal was to sensitively portray the similarities and differences among families from all over the world, with a keen awareness of the fact that my images could possibly be a child’s introduction to this multitude of ethnicities and cultures. It was important to me that I depict this variety of cultures in a fun way that acknowledged their various differences without stereotyping or exaggerating anything, intentionally or unintentionally.

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Aana Aata (Azeri Latin).
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Matka Tata (Polish).

I’m happy to report that the print of the books being sold on stands is just beautiful. I’ve never seen my work in print reflect my original illustrations this well.

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Some of the final pages.

You can buy a copy of the book at this link!

And if you’re interesting in looking at rough sketches, works-in-progress and rejected artwork, go to this page.

Illustrations: The Best Films of the ’60s

Digital illustrations I did for MovieMezzanine.com’s History of Film series as it covered the best films of the ’60s.

For work-in-progress stills, line drawings, details, variants et al, visit my Behance post.

Click on the images below to enlarge them.

PSYCHO (1960) | Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
PSYCHO (1960) | Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962) | ​Directed by David Lean
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962) | ​Directed by David Lean
PLAYTIME (1967) | Directed by Jacques Tati
PLAYTIME (1967) | Directed by Jacques Tati
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) | ​Directed by Stanley Kubrick
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) | ​Directed by Stanley Kubrick
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) | ​Directed by Stanley Kubrick - (Line Drawing)
2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968) | ​Directed by Stanley Kubrick – (Line Drawing)
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) | ​Directed by Sergio Leone
ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) | ​Directed by Sergio Leone

Photography: People (Bangalore III)

People photographed in Bangalore.

Shot with a Canon EOS 600D. All pictures clicked between 26th August and 7th September 2013.

In those two weeks of intense photography, in which I clicked hundreds and hundreds of pictures, I decided I would ask permission of my “subjects” before I clicked them whenever I could.

Also, I was careful with my camera settings; these photos either have very minimal post-production or none. This is an attempt to make my film-making/photography less reliant on post work and more based on deliberate production.

ANNOUNCEMENTS: New Behance Page + New Music and Animation

Hey followers and whoever-else-is-reading…

So I’m trying something new:  posting announcement-things! Let’s see if this goes anywhere.

First off, you might notice that this website isn’t called krishnabalashenoi.wordpress.com anymore; I bought my own domain name, so yaay! And as you can see, things have changed a lot since you were last here. Are the changes for the better? Do let me know.

The main reason I’m posting this, however, is to let you peeps know that I now have a Behance page! It doesn’t have nearly as much content as this place does, and with reason; the Behance page is meant to be a tighter, more condensed (and more drab and businesslike) portfolio of my work. But please go ahead and share it if you like what you find there, and I’d appreciate it if you appreciated some stuff too. And maybe commented, though that might be asking for a bit much.

Also, just so this post isn’t devoid of new content, I’m posting two tiny new things that I’ve done in the recent past.

The first is just a sonic experiment, sampling one of my favorite composers of all time, John Williams. I had a lot of fun making this:

The second is a little animation. I spent hours on these ten seconds, using a newly acquired software TVPaint Animation Pro. I suspect it will open new doors in my work.

And finally, I’m soon to start work on my first proper music video for a new up and coming band in Bangalore, “Machli.” You can check out their awesome work here. Of all the projects I’m working on at present, this is the one that excites me most. Hopefully, you’ll see the final thing soon.

Live long and prosper,
Krishna

Maximum Metropolis – An Experimental Film

A much too formal description of the film:

“Maximum Metropolis” is an experimental film that aims to encapsulate a variety of responses one could have to urban Bangalore.

The audio design of the film is a coalescence of sound recordings and original musical compositions. Some of the sounds were created utilizing and manipulating the sounds of objects that one finds in the quintessential Indian urban space—plastic bottles, staplers, pill bottles, to name a few. Also in the mix are ambient sounds of such spaces; schools, supermarkets, urban and suburban neighborhoods.

The composition is comprised of three movements:

The first, “Cat in Concrete” is a microcosm of that sensation one sometimes experiences when overwhelmed by the cacophony in an urban space. The movement conjures up a domestic cat, lost in the terrifying concrete jungle that is the city of Bangalore.

“Sweaty Uniforms” transposes the listener to the quieter public urban spaces, to the schools, to the parks, and eventually settles into the sunset of the day.

Preceded by a brief conversation with an elderly man, “Family Bonfires” celebrates the more pleasant, more private moments of an urban lifestyle; the moments born out of human interactions. Chats, arguments, laughter, contact and song. Human voices are the key instrument here, but they have been reversed, for what is being said is less important here than how it is being said.

Illustrations: Roger Ebert’s “The Thinking Molecules of Titan” (36 pieces)

Before he died, Roger began writing “The Molecules of Titan”, a story about space exploration set in part at his beloved University of Illinois. He never got a chance to finish it. In the spirit of Roger’s belief in crowd participation, RogerEbert.com is holding a contest to help complete the story.

I was offered the job of illustrating the stories, 33 in number.

One of my goals with these was to have as wide a range of styles as possible, since the stories were all so diverse. Also, I didn’t want it to get boring, both for viewers and for myself.

And so here are all of the finished illustrations, plus two that I had illustrated for Roger’s original story and an additional unused one. Links to the RogerEbert.com pages with the endings and my accompanying illustrations are in the descriptions of each of the images. Also in each description is a little note on the illustration.

For loads of extra images, including early sketches, unused illustrations, variants, etc., click here.

 

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