Category Archives: Animation

ANNOUNCEMENTS: New Behance Page + New Music and Animation

Hey followers and whoever-else-is-reading…

So I’m trying something new:  posting announcement-things! Let’s see if this goes anywhere.

First off, you might notice that this website isn’t called krishnabalashenoi.wordpress.com anymore; I bought my own domain name, so yaay! And as you can see, things have changed a lot since you were last here. Are the changes for the better? Do let me know.

The main reason I’m posting this, however, is to let you peeps know that I now have a Behance page! It doesn’t have nearly as much content as this place does, and with reason; the Behance page is meant to be a tighter, more condensed (and more drab and businesslike) portfolio of my work. But please go ahead and share it if you like what you find there, and I’d appreciate it if you appreciated some stuff too. And maybe commented, though that might be asking for a bit much.

Also, just so this post isn’t devoid of new content, I’m posting two tiny new things that I’ve done in the recent past.

The first is just a sonic experiment, sampling one of my favorite composers of all time, John Williams. I had a lot of fun making this:

The second is a little animation. I spent hours on these ten seconds, using a newly acquired software TVPaint Animation Pro. I suspect it will open new doors in my work.

And finally, I’m soon to start work on my first proper music video for a new up and coming band in Bangalore, “Machli.” You can check out their awesome work here. Of all the projects I’m working on at present, this is the one that excites me most. Hopefully, you’ll see the final thing soon.

Live long and prosper,
Krishna

Animation: Quick, 30-Second Experiments

Just to keep myself occupied this summer, I’ve been occasionally trying my hand(s) at animation. Both these clips are simply quick experiments–I had no idea what I wanted to end up with when I started, which is pretty evident. I was just having fun animating stuff.

The first is a stop-motion animation test. I spent exactly 35 minutes animating and about the same amount of time putting it all together. (Click here for more stop-motion.)

 

 

The second is a piece of 2-D animation. Now this one, I really had no idea what I was doing.  I began with some bizarre Pokemon-esque reptile and went to cell division and trees growing and all kinds of weird places. All in a day’s work.

 

 

I dunno. I hope to do something more substantial and meaningful this summer, but these were just fun.

Music: “A Visiting Cat” – an animated short film by Azra Sadr

 

This short film was thought up and animated by my immensely talented friend from college, Azra Sadr, whose work you can see more of here. The film tells the story of a lonely boy who befriends a cat that crosses his path. While the its company ends his loneliness for a while, the cat eventually leaves him. While initially disheartened, the boy comes to realize that life has more happiness to offer him.

My role in this project was simply associated with the original music, which I composed and arranged on FL Studio, using the VST Edirol. I tried, within the short running time, to create leitmotifs associated with characters and events, and avoided using sound effects by having the music do the job for me, much like the classical Disney shorts.

Film: My Homages to Ray Harryhausen (Age: 9 to 19)

A compilation of some of my attempts at stop-motion animation and other special effects, from when I was 9 to 19, inspired by the work of special effects wizard Ray Harryhausen, who died March 7th at 92.

While many filmmakers brought me into film, Harryhausen was the first to bring me behind the scenes. He has left us a great deal of inspiration, and will continue to have a profound influence on anyone who has the good fortune to come across his work.

This video accompanies an article I wrote for the Far-Flungers section of RogerEbert.com. In it, I write about Ray Harryhausen’s distinguished career, how it has influenced the film world and how it has made an impact on me and my life. I also write a little more about the clips in the video above.

Film: “Steven Spielberg – Animated Tribute” (2012)

 

An animated tribute to my hero, filmmaker Steven Spielberg. You’ve probably seen the films featured in this movie already, but if you haven’t, you really should.

Rotoscoped frame by frame on Adobe Flash CS5, composited and edited on Sony Vegas Pro 12. Backgrounds created on Adobe Photoshop CS5. Music by John Williams

This short film was featured in one of my pieces for the Far-Flungers section of RogerEbert.com, along with an article in which I explain my admiration for Spielberg and the reasons why I consider him my hero. Amazingly, Spielberg happened to see my short film there and hand-wrote me a letter in response. He ended his letter with these words: “I’ll be looking out at the horizon to see where next you will emerge– and impress.”

For more on this film and the letter, click here.

Film: “Tissue: A Love Story” (2011)

 

Richard Linklater’s wonderful “Waking Life” left me fascinated with rotoscoping, and so I’ve tried some of my own. It took a lot of work: five long days of six to seven hours each, continuously animating away at my laptop.

The video eventually didn’t turn out as good as I wanted it to, because of several reasons… the original animation files got ruined somewhere along the transition from SWF format to WMV, making them strobe a lot more than they should; the deadline was up before I knew it and I rushed a lot of the work (I had just a week’s time to conceive, complete and submit the project).

But even though it didn’t end up the way I planned, I am proud of it. So there you go. And Roger Ebert has called it “Wonderful…” so I must be doing something right!

Oh, and the music: “Rhapsody in Blue” is a wonderful piece of music I was introduced to via “Fantasia 2000”.